Certified Flight Instructor
Lincoln, Beatrice, Crete and Seward area in Nebraska

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Free Digital Video of Each Lesson

About John

Certified Flight Instructor

My name is John Cox and I teach 11th grade Physics at Pius X High School in Lincoln. I soloed on my 16th birthday and then progressed through the Private, Instrument, and Commercial ratings. I am now an Instrument Flight Instructor and Advanced Ground Instructor. I also have a Bachelor’s degree from UNL in Mechanized Agriculture, a Bachelors degree from UNO in Electronics Engineering Technology and a Nebraska Teaching Certificate in Secondary Math and Physics.

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Many instructors give lessons in order to build time on their way to an airline job. I am not giving lessons just to build time. I am a professional flight instructor with the goal of being the best flight instructor possible. My dream is to share the beauty of God’s creation with people who appreciate the amazing capability of these machines to lift off the ground and fly with the birds and clouds.

Our Aircraft

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N869NE - Cessna 152

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This aircraft has new paint, new interior and a new engine. It’s mission in life is to teach people to fly.  Probably 9 out of every 10 pilots in the United States learned to fly in an airplane of this type. Spring steel landing gear lets you land from 3 feet in the air and plop onto the runway without a scratch.  It doesn’t go very fast or haul a lot of weight but it’s cheap to rent, reliable, and fun to fly. Build your confidence with CROSSWIND BOOTCAMP™.

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N83180 – Piper Archer

N83180 – Piper Archer

This is our 4 passenger Instrument trainer. Equipped with the latest Instrument Certified GPS and coupled Autopilot, this aircraft is the perfect airplane for learning to fly in the clouds. The low-wing design is safe and stable. This is the favorite of graduates wanting to rent an airplane to travel cross country on business or family trips. In the photo we are practicing formation flying.

N5070D – Super Decathlon

N5070D – Super Decathlon

Let’s Roll! This 180 HP fuel injected racehorse is our aerobatics and tailwheel trainer. The 2 seat tandem seating with a control stick is the most fun you will ever have. Fly a tailwheel airplane off a grass runway the way flying was meant to be.  Strap into the 5 point seatbelt harness and try some loops and rolls. Do upset recovery training or the EASYSPIN™ CFI Endorsement. We fly with as many as six GoPro cameras and an airshow smoke system.

Rental Rates
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All aircraft rates are per hour Hobbs time and include fuel. Aircraft rental is subject to sales tax but flight instruction is not. Renters insurance required for flights without the instructor.

Cessna 152………..$89
Piper Archer……….$128
Super Decathlon…..$158
Flight Instruction…..$56
Ground Instruction…$27
Parachutes…………2x$20/flight
Headset……………No Charge
In-Flight Video…….No Charge
Payment options: Cash, Check or Credit Card
3% Convenience fee for Credit Card transactions

Reputation
• Would be well known, trusted and admired in the community.
• Would follow the Federal Aviation Regulations in letter and in spirit.

Demeanor
• Would be professionally dressed and well groomed.
• Would be on-time and prepared.
• Would be flexible with scheduling changes.
• Would be 100% honest respecting people’s time and money.
• Would be kind, friendly and approachable.
• Would remember people’s names and greet them enthusiastically.

Availability
• Would be available in person at the airport and aviation activities, as well as by phone, text, email and website.

Marketing
• Would market him/herself actively to the pilot community and the general community.
• Would charge reasonable rates and provide flexible payment options to facilitate student enrollment.
• Would call pilots to suggest continued training and remind them when Flight Reviews are due.

Quality
• Would be well organized and efficient, maintaining files and databases on contacts.
• Would target Flight Reviews to specific areas depending on pilot needs per questionare.
• Would have access to a fleet of modern, well maintained, capable aircraft.
• Would teach in an efficient effective manner that students would recognize as high quality instruction.
• Would have high standards of knowledge and skill and have a reputation as the best instructor in the country.
• Would be quiet and humble, asking clear concise Socratic questions that invoke deep thought and understanding.
• Would be positive and enlightening, praising students at an effective personal level.

Training
• Would be well trained and experienced with years of flight time and interesting stories.
• Would have Flight Instructor friends and contacts to get ideas and advice from.
• Would stay up to date on aviation changes through subscriptions and personal contacts.

LearningPlateaus

This graph shows the skill level a person might possess on the left versus an approximate number of lessons across the bottom.  Notice the rapid increase in skill in the first few lessons followed by a leveling off just prior to solo.  This is the classic learning plateau most students face.  When the light bulb finally goes on, you get a big jump in skill and the first solo flight goes well.  Training then proceeds and a second, smaller plateau is reached just prior to your checkride.

Each of these stages in skill development are often separated by periods of inactivity.  It is not unusual to have a student fly hard for a month or two, do the first solo, and then take a break before making a second push.  Be careful not to stay idle for too long, as it is easy to drop out permanently at these points in the process.

Key points to remember:

  • Expect your progress to slow at these key times.
  • Taking a break from training is normal and healthy.
  • With persistence you will succeed.

 

The ideal student pilot…
…is persistent
• Maintains progress in training from start to finish.
• Monitors their own learning and makes adjustments as needed.
• Asks questions and actively participates in the learning process.

…is polite
• Is friendly and humble.
• Calls ahead if they are going to be late.
• Reschedules lessons at least 12 hours in advance if a conflict arises.

…does their homework
• Has completed the assigned readings and tasks before arriving for a lesson.
• Records questions during home study to ask the instructor about.

…is prepared
• Brings all required books and equipment to each lesson.
• Checks the weather before coming to the airport or arrives early and checks the weather.

…is fiscally responsible
• Brings a checkbook to lessons and pays bills promptly
• Arranges for lines of credit as needed to maintain training progress.

…communicates well
• Discusses problems and concerns with the instructor right away.
• Maintains communications with other pilots-in-training to discuss problems and concerns.
• Never makes solo flights without the knowledge and approval of the instructor.

…is a self-motivated learner
• Calls AWOS on a regular basis to learn what various ceilings and visibilities look like.
• Reads books and magazine articles on aviation subjects that enhance learning.
• Uses the Internet as an additional resource to books and the instructor.

…is mature
• Treats rental planes with care and professionalism.
• Reports any damage or malfunction to the airplane owner immediately.
• Takes instant responsibility for any damage caused to airplanes or property.

…is safe
• Does not hot-rod or show off in the car or the airplane.
• Does no unapproved maneuvers in any airplane at any time.
• Uses flight following on a regular basis going cross country.
• Uses aircraft checklists without rushing progress.

The Top 10 Barriers That Stop Women From Learning to Fly:

The authors of Influencer: The Power to Change Anything explain in order to get anyone to do anything, such as a woman learning to fly, she must see the benefit and, she must be convinced she has the means and ability to learn to fly. Here are the barriers identified in the Wolf Aviation Fund Teaching Women to Fly Research Project.

#1 Lack of money for General Aviation flight training.

#2 Instructor-student communication incompatibility (Mars vs. Venus).

#3 Instructor Interuptus- Instructors leave flight instructing to take airline or charter service jobs often requiring the student to start over with another instructor. This is time consuming, expensive and discouraging to many female students.

#4 Lack of female mentors and support systems to encourage the female student.

#5 Personal lack of confidence in their ability and a “fear of flying,” especially stalling the airplane too early in the training process.

#6 Lack of experience with and knowledge of mechanical systems.

#7 Lack of map reading experience & orienteering skills.

#8 Flight schools perceived as indifferent to female students.

#9 Famous female pilots largely unknown as role models to non-aviator women.

#10 Lack of emotional support from family & friends, who perceive flying as “too dangerous”.

If these barriers erode or destroy the female student’s perception of the benefit of or her confidence to achieve the goal of pilot certification, then she either never begins flight training or drops out. Talk to your instructor right away if are experiencing frustration in any of these areas so a solution can be found and you will succeed!

“Couldn’t have done it without you!”

John, thanks again for all your help. Couldn’t have done it without you!
Mark Moore
2014-11-26T13:31:39+00:00
John, thanks again for all your help. Couldn’t have done it without you! Mark Moore

“You have been a great teacher.”

John…thank you for preparing me so well for the check ride. You have been a great teacher, and really taught me a lot. [the examiner] even thought so too, and told me several times that you send a lot of good students his way, some of the best he has had.
Jim Barber
2015-07-06T11:14:10+00:00
John…thank you for preparing me so well for the check ride. You have been a great teacher, and really taught me a lot. [the examiner] even thought so too, and told me several times that you send a lot of View Full →

“…completely painless.”

Hi John,
The check ride was completely painless. Overall, he said I fly the plane very well. Thank you.
Cara Waldo
2015-07-06T11:15:49+00:00
Hi John, The check ride was completely painless. Overall, he said I fly the plane very well. Thank you. Cara Waldo

“…you did a good job…”

Hi John. [the examiner] gives a good, comprehensive, fair check-ride. He said you did a good job and he wished all the candidates were as prepared as I was.
Travis Nelson
2015-07-06T11:16:54+00:00
Hi John. [the examiner] gives a good, comprehensive, fair check-ride. He said you did a good job and he wished all the candidates were as prepared as I was. Travis Nelson

“Thanks for helping me become a pilot!”

Thanks again for all your help as an instructor and helping me become a pilot! [the examiner] thought I had a nice touch and was proficient with my maneuvers. I am happy to have my Private Pilot’s certificate.
Shane Forney
2015-07-06T11:17:44+00:00
Thanks again for all your help as an instructor and helping me become a pilot! [the examiner] thought I had a nice touch and was proficient with my maneuvers. I am happy to have my Private Pilot’s certificate. Shane Forney

“It was a blast..”

Hi John. I just wanted to take a minute to thank you for helping me reach my life-long dream. It was a blast learning from you and you are an awesome CFI. I also feel like I made a good friend. I have great respect for you passing on your skills.
Frank Clarke
2015-07-06T11:18:35+00:00
Hi John. I just wanted to take a minute to thank you for helping me reach my life-long dream. It was a blast learning from you and you are an awesome CFI. I also feel like I made a good View Full →

John Cox is a freelance flight instructor helping dozens of people to realize their dream of flight.